Why is the festival called Jabberwocky Market?

Posted on Tuesday 10 December

Photo: deviant art (please click on photo for source)

 

 

 

 

 

We are often asked why the festival is called Jabberwocky Market, and this blog seems like the best place to share the story.

The festival is made for and by people of Darlington; a town traditionally known for markets. We get a lot of support from the various markets in town and want to bring a new one – one at which you can buy stories and experiences.

One definition of market is “a regular gathering of people for the purchase and sale of provisions, livestock, and other commodities”

The festival is a regular gathering of people for the purchase and sale of a rather more ephemeral product, it’s a market, but not as you know it.

So to explain the type of market, we sought a name that has connections with stories, fiction and culture, and one that links to Darlington.

Jabberwocky is the name of the fictional creature that appears in verse in Alice through the Looking Glass; a poem written when Lewis Carroll lived at Croft-on-Tees and said to be inspired by the older myth of the Sockburn Worm, slaughtered in the 1400s just beyond Neasham.

It all fit together like a jigsaw and so Jabberwocky Market was born.

If you want to know more about it:

Chris Lloyd, local historian and Deputy Editor of the Northern Echo, talks in depth about the historical stories regularly through the Darlington Historical Society and in many books and publications.

Sockburn Hall is currently undergoing a restoration process, with support from English Heritage.

Here is the Markets page on the Darlington Council website, so you can see other specialist events happening in the town.

Re-posted from the main Jabberwocky Market website

See the original post here: http://www.jabberwockymarket.org.uk/blog_entry/2614/home/blog/follow_our_blog/why_is_the_festival_called_jabberwocky_market

And here’s Lewis Carroll’s poem in full…

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!’

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought —
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood a while in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One two! One two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

‘And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
Oh frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’
He chortled in his joy.

‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

poem taken from http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/171647

Re-posted from the main Jabberwocky Market website